Thomas Donnell

M, b. circa 1712, d. circa 1795
FatherWilliam McDonnell b. 1681, d. Jan 1730
MotherMary (?)
     Thomas Donnell was born circa 1712 in Ireland.1 He married Jane Latham in 1743 in Pennsylvania, USA. Thomas Donnell died circa 1795.
     He in 1737 moved to Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania was getting crowded, and it was difficult to acquire land, so the family moved south. He moved to the Nottingham Colony in North Carolina and secured grants of land from the agents of Lord Carteret, Earl of Granville. He and his family were active in the Buffalo Presbyterian Church in Guildford County in December 1753 as documented by Rankin and cited by Charles Donnell.2 The Buffalo Presbyterian Church was located just north of the center of Greensboro, North Carolina and its location has been absorbed as the city expanded.3
From Rankin, to remind those of us who grew up in relative prosperity:
“Our ancestors were real pioneers. All this section between North Buffalo and Reedy Fork Creeks was heavily covered with oak, chestnut, hickory, and poplar timber and thick underbrush. Even as late as 1781, after the Guilford Court House battle. General Greene, in reporting that battle to Congress, says: ''The greater part of this country is a wilderness, with a few cleared fields interspersed here and there."
Their first job was to clear the land and build their homes. Only a few acres could be cleared per year, and their first homes were the rudest log cabins. Their food must have been very plain and without any variety. They were having a hard time those first few years.
We have no local history describing their living conditions, but we have John Hill Martin's history which gives a minute description of the early living conditions of the first settlers in Pennsylvania. He relates that their homes were small one-room log cabins with one door and one small window and the window had no glass, just a wooden shutter. The cabins were covered with thatch or clapboards. The chimneys were usually built of sticks and mud. The floors were dirt. Their food, to a large extent, was the flesh of wild animals, and that without salt most of the time. Both men and women usually wore clothes and hats made from the skins of wild beasts. Their shoes were made from raw hides. Their furniture was hand made from rough materials. The coverings for their beds were usually the pelts of deer, beavers, bears, and wolves. No doubt this is a pretty good description of the living conditions of our ancestors for the first few years after they settled here in a wilderness. We do know their cabins were very crude and that the floors were dirt.
Wild animals were numerous, and they could secure their meat by killing buffaloes, bears, deer and squirrels. Wild fowls were plentiful, such as turkeys and quail; and also wild geese and wild pigeons in their season. Even as late as one hundred years ago the wild pigeons were still so numerous in their migration season that in passing over, they would at times hide the sun like a big cloud. The creeks were well stocked with fish. This would have been a veritable paradise for sportsmen, but our ancestors hunted and fished more for their food supply than for sport.
Their patches of wheat were cut with a small hand sickle, flailed from the straw, then separated from the chaff by pouring it from a platform on a windy day; and both wheat and corn were pounded into meal, or ground with a small hand mill, like our old coffee mills. With such crude methods of harvesting and handling wheat they could raise only small patches. Wheat bread was a rarity to be enjoyed only for breakfast on Sunday morning. Corn was the main crop and supplied bread for the family and feed for the stock.4
Rankin, in the History of the Buffalo Church, has a lengthy discussion of the Revolutionary War. In North Carolina, most of the fighting was between the English loyalists (Toreys) and the colonists who were Whigs. It was more like gang or clan warfare than organized militias. Participation of the Donnells, especially Thomas's sons was extensive. Most of his sons were in companies organized by Captain William Donnell or his brother Major John Donnell.5

Family: Jane Latham

Citations

  1. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.
  2. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  3. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, Buffalo Presbyterian Church, p. 9.
  4. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, Buffalo Presbyterian Church, p. 16-17.
  5. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, Buffalo Presbyterian Church, p. 194-5.

William McDonnell

M, b. 1681, d. January 1730
FatherBryan Mac Donald1 b. 1645, d. Feb 1707
MotherMary Combs
     William McDonnell was born in 1681 in Glencoe, Scotland. He married Mary (?)2 William McDonnell died in January 1730.3
     He settled in Cecil County, Maryland. William dropped the "Mac" and picked up the "Mc". His three sons dropped the "Mc" completely.
He moved to Cumberland County, then part of Lancaster County about 1743, then on to Guilford County, Carolina, after the birth of their fifth child in 1752.4

Family: Mary (?)

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S1] Charles E Donnell, Donnell-Langford, p. 8.
  3. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 34. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.
  4. [S1] Charles E Donnell, Donnell-Langford, p. 9.

Bryan Mac Donald1

M, b. 1645, d. February 1707
FatherAlexander MacDonald b. c 1610, d. 13 Feb 1692
     Bryan Mac Donald was born in 1645 in Glencoe, Scotland.2 He married Mary Combs circa 1677.3 Bryan Mac Donald died in February 1707 in New Castle, Delaware, USA.4 His estate was probated on 19 March 1707 after the will was written on 23 February 1707. That would establish his death as late February or early March 1707.4
     He and Mary Combs emigrated in 1686, after a brief stay (perhaps 2 years) in the north of Ireland, and settled, with their first three children, in Mill Creek, Mill Creek Hundred, Delaware, USA.3 From the source:
Penn’s New Castle Warrants records 200 acres to Bryan Mac Donald on Nov. 1, 1689. There was also record of a deed to him for “354 acres and 19 acres over’ on Red Clay Creek, dated December 20, 1703. This shows that he was of the better class of immigrants and had money to buy land. Many settlers at this date had insufficient money to pay passage over and bound themselves for a certain length of time to the person who furnished the passage money.3
A will discovered by John A. Donnell indicated that Bryan spelled his name both MacDonnell and Mac Donald in the text of the will and signed it MacDonald. Occasionally the spelling adopted the Irish form of McDonald from their time in Ireland.
The variations from the original Mac Donald used by Bryan's descendants include MacDonnell, MacDonald, Donald (just dropped the Mac), Donnald, Donneld, and Mc Donald.5

Family: Mary Combs

Citations

  1. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 44. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.
  2. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells, p. 74.
  3. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells, p. 31.
  4. [S239] Delaware Wills, 1682-1800 Ancestry.com. New Castle County, Will of Bryan McDonnell (Provo, Utah, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc,, 2000), Book B, p. 153. Hereinafter cited as Will of Bryan McDonnell.
  5. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells, p. 35.
  6. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  7. [S240] F. B. Kegley, Kegley's Virginia frontier : the beginning of the Southwest, the Roanoke of colonial days, 1740-1783, with maps and illustrations (Roanoke, Virginia: Southwest Virginia Historical Society, 1938). Hereinafter cited as Kegley's Virginia frontier.

Alexander MacDonald

M, b. circa 1610, d. 13 February 1692
     Alexander MacDonald was born circa 1610. He married a daughter of Archibald MacDonald of Keppoch. He was killed at the age of 82 with his wife in the Glencoe Massacre on 13 February 1692.1
     Alexander MacDonald was also known as Allistair or Alexander MacIain.2 He was the 12th Chief of the Glencoe MacDonald Clan.3 According to Charles Donnell's account, Scotland was undergoing serious civil and religious strife. The rulers in Scotland had accepted the Roman Catholic faith and many Protestants had begun leaving for Ireland. Soon after, the Irish officially adopted the Catholic faith and the emigrants continued their move westward.

Members of the MacDonald clan who remained were targeted by King William and more than 30 were killed at Glencoe, either outright, or by being left to starve or freeze to death. The elder Alexander MacDonald and his wife were told they would be spared but were killed anyway. Charles’ account attributes the massacre to Clan Campbell, but the issue was more complicated.

The MacDonalds and Campbells had competed for the same territory in Scotland for generations, the northwest coast of Scotland and the islands. Their feuds dated back to the 1400s. By the late 1600s, the power of the Campbells had increased, while the MacDonald's power had waned. In fact, Glencoe and the other regions occupied by the MacDonalds were largely surrounded by the Campbells who could make travel difficult if they wanted to.4

The Wikipedia page provides a detailed accounting. The MacDonalds had sworn allegiance to King James and, after the Jacobite rebellion had failed, had not sworn allegiance to King William and Queen Mary, for which the penalty was death. Robert Campbell of Glenlyon was the commander of a small force of which some of the soldiers were also Campbells. The total force sent against the MacDonalds was about 400.1

There is a different version on the wikitree genealogy site that is much more charitable to Campbell. At the wikitree site, there is a link to a documentary of the Massacre of Glencoe.

The following is extracted from the wikitree site:
"Alexander, 12th Chief of Macdonald of Glencoe was late in taking his oath of allegiance to King William. As a result, it was decided to make an example out of the clan. A plan was hatched and on February 13, 1692. Alexander along with 37 other clan members were murdered by the Earl of Argyll's Regiment of Foot under the command of Captain Robert Campbell of Glenlyon. ... He was to spare none below the age of seventy. The resulting massacre is remembered not just for its premeditated brutality but for its violation of an unwritten code of conduct: the perpetrators of the deed had enjoyed the hospitality of their victims for twelve days before turning on them. In 1688 the removal of James II and VII in favor of William of Orange had led to the first ever Jacobite uprising. Its leader, Viscount Dundee, died at the battle of Killiecrankie and the rebellion broke up. All that remained was to pacify the Highland chiefs who had joined the enterprise. To this end a proclamation was issued in August 1691 requiring clan chiefs to take the Oath of Allegiance to King William by Hogmanay that year. By the accident of reporting to the wrong official at the last possible moment, Clan MacDonald of Glencoe missed the vital deadline. Secretary of State James Dalymple, Master of Stair, was no friend to the MacDonalds. This was the excuse he had been waiting for. The order for the massacre went ahead. The chief, 33 other men, 2 women, and 2 children were killed. In defiance of his orders Robert Campbell spared the nearly one hundred women and children from slaughter and chose instead to drive them into the dark of a winter nights storm. Of which, all but a few were able to survive."5


Yet another website, "Highland Titles" provides a very balanced description of the events leading up to the massacre.6

Family:

Citations

  1. [S44] Wikipedia Entry - Massacre of Glencoe, online https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massacre_of_Glencoe. Hereinafter cited as Massacre of Glencoe.
  2. [S48] Reverends A MacDonald, The Clan Donald (Enberness: The Northern Counties Publishing Company, Ltd, 1904). Hereinafter cited as Clan Donald.
  3. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 6., citing work done by John A. Donnell. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  4. [S1] Charles E Donnell, Donnell-Langford, p. 7.
  5. [S45] Alexander (MacDonald) Laird MacDonald of Glencoe, online https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/…,example%20out%20of%20the%20clan. Hereinafter cited as MacDonald of Glencoe.
  6. [S46] Glencoe Massacre: Truth or Spin?, online https://www.highlandtitles.com/blog/the-glencoe-massacre/. Hereinafter cited as Glencoe Massacre: Truth or Spin?

Mary Combs1

F
     Mary Combs married Bryan Mac Donald, son of Alexander MacDonald, circa 1677.2
     Mary Combs and Bryan Mac Donald emigrated in 1686, after a brief stay (perhaps 2 years) in the north of Ireland, and settled, with their first three children, in Mill Creek, Mill Creek Hundred, Delaware, USA.2 This land was initially part of Pennsylvania.

Family: Bryan Mac Donald b. 1645, d. Feb 1707

Citations

  1. [S240] F. B. Kegley, Kegley's Virginia frontier : the beginning of the Southwest, the Roanoke of colonial days, 1740-1783, with maps and illustrations (Roanoke, Virginia: Southwest Virginia Historical Society, 1938), p. 199. Hereinafter cited as Kegley's Virginia frontier.
  2. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 31. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.

John MacDonnell

M, b. 1679, d. 1755
FatherBryan Mac Donald1 b. 1645, d. Feb 1707
MotherMary Combs
     John MacDonnell was born in 1679 in Glencoe, Scotland. He died in 1755 in New Castle, Delaware, USA.2
     He settled in at Big Spring, Cumberland, Pennsylvania, USA, in 1735.3 John MacDonnell is the progenitor and primary interest of the authors of "The Donnell History" and "The Donnells - The Family in America." John MacDonnell was mistakenly identified as Thomas in the book "The Donnell History" published in 1912.

Family:

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 43. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.
  3. [S1] Charles E Donnell, Donnell-Langford, p. 7.

James MacDonald

M, b. 1683, d. after 1751
FatherBryan Mac Donald1 b. 1645, d. Feb 1707
MotherMary Combs
     James MacDonald was born in 1683 in Glencoe, Scotland. He died after 1751.2

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 34. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.

Thomas MacDonnell

M, b. circa 1715, d. 1775
FatherJohn MacDonnell1 b. 1679, d. 1755
     Thomas MacDonnell was born circa 1715 in New Castle, Delaware, USA. He died in 1775 in Big Spring, Cumberland, Pennsylvania, USA.2
     He settled circa 1735 at Big Spring, Cumberland, Pennsylvania, USA.3

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 7.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 43. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.
  3. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells, p. 75.

James MacDonnell

M, b. after 1690
FatherJohn MacDonnell1 b. 1679, d. 1755
     James MacDonnell was born after 1690 in New Castle, Delaware, USA.2
     He never married and died without children.

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 7.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 43. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.

John MacDonnell

M, b. after 1690
FatherJohn MacDonnell1 b. 1679, d. 1755
     John MacDonnell was born after 1690 in New Castle, Delaware, USA.
     He and Samuel MacDonnell settled in South Carolina after the death of their father circa 1735.2

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 7.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 43. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.

Samuel MacDonnell

M, b. after 1690
FatherJohn MacDonnell1 b. 1679, d. 1755
     Samuel MacDonnell was born after 1690 in New Castle, Delaware, USA.2
     He settled in South Carolina. He and John MacDonnell settled in South Carolina after the death of their father circa 1735.2

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 7.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 43. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.

Mary (?)

F
     Mary (?) married William McDonnell, son of Bryan Mac Donald and Mary Combs.1

Family: William McDonnell b. 1681, d. Jan 1730

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.

Jane Latham

F
     Jane Latham married Thomas Donnell, son of William McDonnell and Mary (?), in 1743 in Pennsylvania, USA.

Family: Thomas Donnell b. c 1712, d. c 1795

James Donnell

M, b. 1744, d. 1811
FatherThomas Donnell b. c 1712, d. c 1795
MotherJane Latham
     James Donnell was born in 1744 at Pennsylvania, USA. It is assumed that the children born before the move to the Nottingham Colony in North Carolina were born in Pennsylvania.1 He married Agnes Denny, daughter of William Denny Sr and Anne (?). James Donnell died in 1811.2
     In 1799, James Donnell and Agnes Denny moved to Tennessee, USA.3

Family: Agnes Denny

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 9.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S1] Charles E Donnell, Donnell-Langford, p. 8-9.
  3. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.

Hannah Donnell

F, b. 1746
FatherThomas Donnell b. c 1712, d. c 1795
MotherJane Latham
     Hannah Donnell was born in 1746 in Pennsylvania, USA.1 She married Alexander McKnight (?)2 Hannah Donnell married George Denny, son of James Denny, in 1775.2

Family 1: Alexander McKnight (?) d. 1774

Family 2: George Denny

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8-9.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.

Major John Donnell

M, b. 4 January 1748, d. 7 May 1822
FatherThomas Donnell b. c 1712, d. c 1795
MotherJane Latham
     Major John Donnell was born on 4 January 1748 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA.1 He married Hanna Meek in 1771.2 Major John Donnell married Elizabeth Denny, daughter of James Denny and Mary Agnes Aldren, on 1 November 1781.2 Major John Donnell died on 7 May 1822 at Buffalo Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Greensboro, Guilford, North Carolina, USA, at age 74.1
     Between his two wives, he had 15 children: Jane, Thomas, Rebeccas, Adam, Hannah, Nancy, James, Mary, John, William, George, Betsy, Sarah, Ruth and Levi.3

Family 1: Hanna Meek

Family 2: Elizabeth Denny b. 25 Feb 1762, d. 7 May 1847

Citations

  1. [S34] Find A Grave, online findagrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/22154355/john-donnell. Hereinafter cited as Find A Grave.
  2. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.
  3. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 61. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.
  4. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, Buffalo Presbyterian Church, p. 42.
  5. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, Buffalo Presbyterian Church, p. 58.

Robert Donnell Sr

M, d. 1816
FatherWilliam McDonnell b. 1681, d. Jan 1730
MotherMary (?)
     Robert Donnell Sr died in 1816.
     He joined his brother Thomas in the Nottingham Colony in North Carolina in about 1753. Because there were two Robert Donnell's in the Colony, and he was first to arrive, he was known as "Robert, The First."1 He secured two sections, one on North Buffalo and one on Reedy Fork. He first located on North Buffalo Creek and later moved to Reedy Fork. In 1786 he bought one thousand acres on Big Troublesome Creek in Rockingham County.2 Rankin notes that the four Donnells must have been closely related. Thomas Sr and Robert Sr were brothers. James Sr and Robert (the second) may have been nephews.3

Family 1: Mary (?)

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.
  3. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, Buffalo Presbyterian Church, p. 42.

Thomas Donnell

M, b. 1754
FatherThomas Donnell b. c 1712, d. c 1795
MotherJane Latham
     Thomas Donnell was born in 1754 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA.1
     He was a physician at Mecklenburg, Tennessee, USA.

Family: Margaret King

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8-9.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.

Andrew Donnell

M, b. 1757, d. 1835
FatherThomas Donnell b. c 1712, d. c 1795
MotherJane Latham
     Andrew Donnell was born in 1757 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA.1 He married Nancy Brawley, daughter of John Brawley, in 1779.1 Andrew Donnell married Mary Creswell in 1819.1 Andrew Donnell died in 1835.

Family 1: Nancy Brawley b. Feb 1760, d. 6 Apr 1816

Family 2: Mary Creswell

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8-9.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 52. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.

George Donnell

M, b. 1759
FatherThomas Donnell b. c 1712, d. c 1795
MotherJane Latham
     George Donnell was born in 1759 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA.1 He married Isabella Kerr, daughter of David Kerr, in 1784.2
     George Donnell lived near Alamance Church where he was an elder. Had twelve children.3 He moved in 1804 to Wilson, Tennessee, USA.4

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8-9.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells and their Macdonald Ancestors, A History and Genealogy, 157 to 1927 A. D. (Greenfield, Indiana: William Mitchell, 1928), p. 61. Hereinafter cited as The Donnells. Available for download at archive.org.
  3. [S241] Emma A and James Arthur Donnell, The Donnells, p. 62.
  4. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.

Latham Donnell

M, b. circa 1760, d. 1828
FatherThomas Donnell1 b. c 1712, d. c 1795
MotherJane Latham
     Latham Donnell was born circa 1760 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA. He died in 1828.2

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.
  2. [S1] Charles E Donnell, Donnell-Langford, p. 8-9.

Alexander Donnell

M, d. circa 1782
FatherThomas Donnell1 b. c 1712, d. c 1795
MotherJane Latham
     Alexander Donnell died circa 1782died young.

Citations

  1. [S1] Charles E Donnell, A Genealogy of Donnell, Langford and Other Families (Plainview. TX: Self, 1949), p. 8.. Hereinafter cited as Donnell-Langford.

Robert Donnell

M
FatherRobert Donnell Sr d. 1816
MotherMary (?)
     Robert Donnell married Catherine McCALIB in 1776.

John Donnell

M
FatherRobert Donnell Sr d. 1816
MotherMary (?)
     John Donnell married Sarah Donnell, daughter of Robert Donnell (The Second) and Mary (?), in 1779.1

Family: Sarah Donnell

Citations

  1. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.

Thomas Donnell

M, b. 1754
FatherRobert Donnell Sr d. 1816
MotherMary (?)
     Thomas Donnell was born in 1754.1
     He He was a Presbyterian minister, said to have organized the first Protestant church west of the Mississippi River.2 He was educated in Dr. Caldwell's school, and was licensed by Orange Presbytery in 1778. He went as a missionary to the frontier in Tennessee, and when the frontier moved westward he moved with it and located in Missouri.1

Citations

  1. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 153. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.
  2. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, Buffalo Presbyterian Church, p. 24.

Mary Donnell

F
FatherRobert Donnell Sr d. 1816
MotherMary (?)
     Mary Donnell married James Denny, son of William Denny Sr and Anne (?), in 1772.1 Mary Donnell married John McAdoo in 1782.1

Family 2: John McAdoo

Citations

  1. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.
  2. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, Buffalo Presbyterian Church, p. 29.

Margaret Donnell

F
FatherRobert Donnell Sr d. 1816
MotherMary (?)

William Donnell

M
FatherRobert Donnell Sr d. 1816
MotherMary (?)
     William Donnell married Martha Denny, daughter of William Denny.1
     William Donnell and Martha Denny lived at Big Troublesome Creek in Rockingham.1

Family: Martha Denny

Citations

  1. [S184] Rev. S. M. Rankin, History of the Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People (Greensboro, North Carolina: Joseph J. Stone & Co., Printers and Binders, c. 1935), p. 24. Hereinafter cited as Buffalo Presbyterian Church.